Viewing entries posted in May 2013

Why should I get my rabbit vaccinated?

Posted by Vetcall on 31 May 2013

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All pet rabbits should be vaccinated against Viral Haemorrhagic Disease.  This disease is highly contagious and rapidly fatal and is caused by a Calicivirus.  This virus was introduced into New Zealand several years ago to help control the wild rabbit population.  Your rabbit does not need to have direct contact with wild rabbits to catch the disease. The earliest your rabbit can be vaccinated is ten weeks of age.  A health check and booster vaccination is recommended annually thereafter in all rabbits. Click here for more information about the new V2 strain of rabbit calicivirus and protection of your rabbit.

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My dog needs de-sexing, what is involved?

Posted by Vetcall on 31 May 2013

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Unless you plan to breed from your dog, he/she should be neutered at four to six months of age. Neutered male dogs tend to be less aggressive toward other dogs (especially other male dogs) and don't roam the neighborhood seeking out female dogs in heat.  Neutering your male dog also prevents many health problems that commonly occur later in life e.g. testicular cancer, perineal hernias and prostate problems. Having your female dog neutered reduces the number of unwanted puppies and also prevents many health problems which are commonly encountered later in life e.g. mammary tumours, uterine infections (termed 'pyometra' - these can be life threatening) and ovarian cysts and tumours. The term for...

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My cat needs de-sexing, what is involved?

Posted by Vetcall on 31 May 2013

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Unless you wish to breed from your cat, he/she should be neutered at four to six months of age. Un-neutered male cats tend to roam and fight a lot and may also start urine spraying in the house.  Fighting can lead to injuries and illness and spread of diseases like Feline Aids (FIV) and Feline Leukemia (FeLV). Un-neutered female cats tend to quickly become pregnant and can have one litter after another.  This is very hard on them and leads to unwanted kittens. The term for neutering a female cat is 'spaying'.  When female cats are spayed both ovaries and the uterus are removed. The term for neutering a male cat is...

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Why should i de-sex my rabbit?

Posted by Vetcall on 31 May 2013

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Unless you plan to breed your rabbit we recommend de-sexing at six months of age. Spaying of female rabbits eliminates the risk of unwanted pregnancy when male and female rabbits are housed together, and also prevents uterine adenocarcinoma (uterine cancer).  This cancer affects about three quarters of female rabbits over four to five years of age and is often fatal. Castration of male rabbits reduces territorial marking (urine spraying), unwanted sexual behaviour and they are also less likely to fight with other male rabbits. De-sexing rabbits is more complicated than in cats and dogs. Rabbits are also very sensitive to anaesthetic drugs and to pain.  Because of this special precautions must be...

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Why should my senior dog have regular senior wellness check-ups?

Posted by Vetcall on 31 May 2013

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Dogs age at five to seven years for every human year and are considered ‘senior’ at about seven years of age. Generally small breeds of dogs live longer than larger breeds.  Some small dog breeds are considered senior at about 10 years of age, while giant breeds are classified as seniors as young as five.    Dogs are very good at hiding early signs of age-related disease and it can be very difficult for both owners and veterinarians to detect early signs of disease.  Many treatable or preventable diseases may have no observable signs early in their course and by the time a change is noticed, the disease may be quite...

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Why should my senior cat have regular senior wellness check-ups?

Posted by Vetcall on 31 May 2013

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Cats age at five to seven years for every human year and are considered ‘senior’ at about seven years of age.  They are very good at hiding early signs of age-related disease and it can be very difficult for both owners and veterinarians to detect early signs of disease.  Many treatable or preventable diseases may have no observable signs early in their course and by the time a change is noticed, the disease may be quite advanced. Studies have shown that as many as 17% of middle aged and senior cats that have appeared healthy upon physical examination have an underlying disease. Early diagnosis is the key to slowing down the...

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Why should i take my puppy to puppy preschool and what is involved?

Posted by Vetcall on 31 May 2013

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Our Puppy Pre-school is a fantastic way to create a bond, learn useful tips and socialise your puppy, as well as getting your puppy used to visiting the vet clinic. Puppies learn how to behave in both human and canine company and how to perform fundamental commands such as sit, stay, come here and heel. You will learn about healthcare for your puppy as well as some key pointers to keep your puppy and family having fun together.  Each training session is accompanied by an easy-to-follow information sheets and advice on how to continue training your puppy at home.  We will do our best to help sort out any behavior problems...

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Why do I need to worm my dog regularly?

Posted by on 31 May 2013

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Dogs and puppies can be affected by roundworms, whipworms, hookworms and tapeworms. Worms can cause stunted growth in puppies and coughing, weight loss, vomiting, diarrhoea, constipation, anemia, dull coat and lethargy in dogs of all ages. Puppies become infected in the womb and or from drinking their mother's milk.  Worm eggs are passed in the faeces and infect the environment.  The eggs can infect both dogs and humans.  Young children are particularly at risk as they are not so good at cleaning their hands, and are often putting all sorts of things in their mouths!  Roundworms can cause skin problems and blindness in humans.  As part of being a responsible dog owner...

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Why do I need to worm my cat regularly?

Posted by Vetcall on 31 May 2013

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Cats and kittens are most commonly affected by two types of worms: roundworms and tapeworms. All kittens become infected with roundworms when they feed on their mother's milk.  Adult cats become infected mainly by grooming and hunting. Roundworms can cause poor growth in kittens, and vomiting, diarrhoea, dull coat and lethargy in cats of all ages. Cats become infected with tapeworms by swallowing fleas (which are infected with the intermediate life stage of the tapeworm) when grooming, and by hunting and eating raw meat. Due to the potentially very serious health risks that worms pose to humans, especially young children and people with compromised immune systems, we recommend a comprehensive worming protocol. Recommended worming...

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How do I prevent my dog from getting fleas?

Posted by Vetcall on 31 May 2013

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Fleas are very irritating and will make your dog feel uncomfortable and itchy.  Some dogs are highly sensitive and allergic to fleas and can develop a severe skin problem known as Flea Allergy Dermatitis (FAD).  As well as causing both you and your dog to scratch, swallowing fleas during grooming can lead to tapeworm infection.  It is better to prevent flea problems than take the 'wait and see approach'.  Each flea can lay up to two thousand eggs, so you can very quickly have a flea ridden dog and house. You are best to avoid pet shop and supermarket variety flea treatments as most of these are notoriously ineffective and some...

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