Viewing entries tagged with "cat"

Why should I get my cat vaccinated?

Posted by Vetcall on 4 July 2017

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Every year cats of all ages become seriously ill or die from infectious diseases which could have been prevented through vaccination.   The micro-organisms' that cause these diseases are wide spread in the New Zealand cat population (for e.g. New Zealand has one of the highest reported rates of infection with Feline aids in the world: approximately 1 in 10 healthy cats, and 1 in 5 feral cats are infected with the feline aids virus). The expression 'prevention is better than cure' is very true since there is no specific treatment for the viral diseases. Treatment is often lengthy, expensive and not always successful. All cats must be fully vaccinated against the...

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Ringworm in Cats and Dogs - is it a worm?

Posted by Claire Cable on 23 March 2017

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This summer we have been seeing more Ringworm cases in kittens than is usual. An understandably common misconception that many of our clients have is that ringworm is caused by a worm.  Ringworm is actually a fungal infection which can affect the skin, hair and nails. The medical term for Ringworm is Dermatophytosis.  ringworm7 The most commonly isolated fungal species are Microsporum canis (commonly referred to as Ringworm), Trichophyton mentagrophytes and Microsporum gypseum. Cats, dogs and other mammals including people can be affected. Ringworm is more common in puppies and kittens than adult cat and dogs. These organisms are everywhere in our environment so like people, animals are exposed to these organisms from an...

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My cat needs de-sexing, what is involved?

Posted by Vetcall on 31 May 2013

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Unless you wish to breed from your cat, he/she should be neutered at four to six months of age. Un-neutered male cats tend to roam and fight a lot and may also start urine spraying in the house.  Fighting can lead to injuries and illness and spread of diseases like Feline Aids (FIV) and Feline Leukemia (FeLV). Un-neutered female cats tend to quickly become pregnant and can have one litter after another.  This is very hard on them and leads to unwanted kittens. The term for neutering a female cat is 'spaying'.  When female cats are spayed both ovaries and the uterus are removed. The term for neutering a male cat is...

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Why should my senior cat have regular senior wellness check-ups?

Posted by Vetcall on 31 May 2013

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Cats age at five to seven years for every human year and are considered ‘senior’ at about seven years of age.  They are very good at hiding early signs of age-related disease and it can be very difficult for both owners and veterinarians to detect early signs of disease.  Many treatable or preventable diseases may have no observable signs early in their course and by the time a change is noticed, the disease may be quite advanced. Studies have shown that as many as 17% of middle aged and senior cats that have appeared healthy upon physical examination have an underlying disease. Early diagnosis is the key to slowing down the...

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What should I feed my cat?

Posted by Vetcall on 31 May 2013

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At Vetcall we recommend that kittens are fed a premium complete kitten food such as Hills Vet Essentials or Royal Canin.  These foods contain the correct balance of nutrients, vitamins and minerals that your kitten needs to grow.  No supplements are required with these diets. If you are feeding Hills Vet Essentials Kitten you should change your kitten onto the adult formula at nine to twelve months of age.  If you are feeding Royal Canin Kitten you should change onto the appropriate neutered formulation following neutering or at six months if your kitten has been neutered early.  Cats over seven years of age should be fed a senior diet. All the foods that...

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